What is CORAC?

CORAC is the Corps of Renewal and Charity, created in 2020 to help people be ready for the storm we could see on the horizon. There are members across the United States, organized into geographical regions, so that everyone has a local group, as well as access to national expertise and support in communications, health and wellness, sustainable living, crisis scenarios and prayer.

The ethic of CORAC is simple: acknowledge God, take the next right step, and be a sign of hope to others. This credo has already gotten me through some hard times. It distills all the noise and fuss down to something anyone can do. 

For people who may be isolated in leftist parts of the country, CORAC provides a forum of like-minded people of faith, so that no one need feel alone in their convictions.

CORAC team leaders have spent over a year building an infrastructure so that in a crisis situation, we would have resources already at our fingertips, ready to deploy, as well as plans thought out in advance. For example, the crisis scenario team has protocols and checklists for a variety of possible emergencies posted on the website, and ready for each family to print out and have on-hand. That team also has a communication plan to deploy in case of emergency.   

One plan relies on a national network of HAM radio operators to get communications out to each member.  The hub is a mega station in the Dallas area, and that particular operator is networked into Bishop Strickland’s ham network for the Tyler diocese.

There are resources on the website for anyone who is not yet certified as a radio operator but wants to get equipped, as well as practice sessions for those who are just listeners on shortwave radio.

The health and wellness team consists of conventional physicians, homeopaths and herbalists. They review protocols for safety and accuracy, and publish those that deal with current health issues; for example, strategies to deal with vaccine injuries, ways to stay healthy through the cold & flu season, medicinal herbs that you can find almost anywhere. Much of what is on the website consists of solutions to problems we might encounter if conventional medicine was not available.

My sister in Kansas had a very bad case of covid last year, and could not get proper treatment in her little town, being unvaxxed. She finally called an MD in the nearest city, who was able to help her enormously. By sheer coincidence, that physician was a CORAC member. Now that doctor is my sister’s regular physician.

The national reach of CORAC has allowed members to find trustworthy doctors in other parts of the country for our family members who live far away. For example, one family here in Tyler had a relative in Illinois who was in serious trouble with covid. The hospital in that area would not treat him. I was able to call the regional coordinator for Illinois, and get a recommendation for a real doctor (one who cares more for the patient than the government) who prescribed the proper medications and got him on the road to recovery.

The sustainable living team deals with such things as farming and gardening, sanitation during emergencies, foraging, canning and preserving food. They do periodic Zoom classes that are recorded and then posted on the website, along with the notes in PDF form.

The prayer team has a national network of people who are actively praying for the monthly intentions of the group, as well as an ongoing Catechism class with Desmond Birch, one of the foremost eschatologists in the Church today.

The prayer team is also in charge of the network which will swing into action in a crisis, and match members who want to check on their out-of-state family members, to CORAC members in that area. This network is still being built, but I was able to access it in February when I had a friend who was terribly sick and stranded in Montana. He’d gone to two ERs for help, and neither one treated him. I called a CORAC member in Montana, who got prescriptions and food to him, as well as a priest who anointed him. (He’s fine now, thanks to that CORAC member.)

That’s the power of having a national infrastructure.

CORAC Geographical Regions

At the local level, it’s up to us to draw people in and build the supportive kind of community that will be like gold if there is a breakdown of any kind. This could look like foraging walks with a group, everyone identifying different plants and taking cuttings or samples. It could be a canning tutorial where all the participants bring fruit and learn how to preserve it safely. It could be a meeting of people bringing their shortwave radios to a central spot to practice tuning. It could be a workshop of emergency medicine, like bleeding control and triage techniques.

In a technology blackout or genuine emergency, we will all be hyper-focused at the local level, by necessity, so it’s important to build relationships and skills within the local groups. Access to national expertise may also be helpful for any knowledge gaps in the local groups.

There is a plan in every town where there is a CORAC member, to meet at the local parish church at 9:00 on the Saturday morning following any multi-day communications blackout. This is our strategy to share information, as well as to seek out those who may need special help.

There is no cost to join CORAC, and some materials on the website are only available to members. In addition, members receive a biweekly newsletter with news items, inspiration, tips for action, and links to helpful resources all around the internet.

So join me and help build a local network that will be charitable, helpful and resourceful in the event of a crisis. If a crisis never materializes (we wish), we will have built a strong community with valuable skills anyway!