Signs

Signs Around Town

Since the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs, I’ve observed protestors on our Tyler public streets and parks half a dozen times, carrying threatening and blasphemous signs. My heart sinks; our mostly Christian, friendly little city, where you see “WE LOVE LIFE” lawn signs all around town, occupied by raging, shouting  women, glorying in their ability to offend.

The website http://www.wewontgoback.com posts the details of pro-abortion protests all over the country and includes downloadable poster designs, though the most disturbing signs I saw in Tyler were homemade ones, more horrific than these from the website. 

Signs have the power to rouse people, for good or ill.

Prayer on the Square

We hold signs, too, when we pray on the town square. Back on January 12, 2022, long before the abortion protests, a group of Catholic prayer warriors began meeting on Wednesday evenings in our city square to pray the rosary. We were acting in solidarity with Catholics in Austria, who had begun to pray for help against the tyrannical measures of their government, under the name “Austria Prays.” We held signs and flags, intended to help wake passersby up to the dangers bearing down on good people all over the world.

The Canadian Truckers’ Convoy was in full swing at that point, and we were eager to support them. They were perhaps the first globally-visible Freedom Fighters, though their efforts ended in apparent defeat. I say “apparent” because the government crackdown on peaceful protestors alerted us to the dangers of central banking when you hold opinions that differ from the government’s official narrative. Prime Minister Trudeau so casually ordered the bank accounts of truckers frozen, that the whole world saw how easy it would be for governments to manipulate a central banking system. For that forewarning alone, the whole Canadian truckers’ movement was worthwhile.

One of the founding couples of our Prayer on the Square arrived from Canada last year, and Martin proudly held the beautiful Maple Leaf flag in the early days, alongside the Stars and Stripes.

Life in little Tyler, Texas was pretty sedate all winter and spring, but we could see the global community rising up against the lies and over-reach of governments. We hoped that Americans would be energized by the Canadian patriots, to fight for freedom here, but Tyler was not feeling the pinch yet. 

When the American People’s Convoy launched on February 23 from California to Washington DC, we were super-enthused. We wished, rather than believed, that it would light a spark in the American people, but it was still not time. Enough people have to be alarmed and personally affected by tyranny before there will be a mass outcry.

So we keep praying, every Wednesday at 5:30, rain or shine. We’ve been meeting for seven months now, and we actually rather enjoy it. There is joy in praying the rosary together, we love the honks from passing cars, and we enjoy our fellowship over dinner afterwards. Since we pray on public sidewalks, we are not required to have a permit, but we’ve had one nevertheless, every week we’ve been out there. It puts us on solid ground with law enforcement, and alerts them to our presence. 

Once a month, we visit the nearby police station with pizza, cookies and other treats, to demonstrate our appreciation, and cultivate a relationship with police. They have our backs, as we saw when the abortion protestors marched in front of the Cathedral. We want them to know that we have theirs. 

Some of our signs could be considered “political,” but at this point, politics are over: there is only good and evil. Is it political to urge Americans to pay very close attention to their freedoms (including freedom to worship) as governments globally crack down? Is it political to point out the dangerous experimental shot that was forced on the world without ever receiving approval (and which still does not have approval,) but which has killed and disabled hundreds of thousands of victims?

Soon we will have a sign of solidarity with farmers worldwide, who are being put out of the food production business, thus setting up a worldwide famine. If Christians don’t stand up for such things, who will? It’s not politics; it’s solidarity.

In the Netherlands, farmers block a major highway with their tractors during a national protest. 

Frankly, I’m not sure God cares about what we call “politics”, but I think He cares a great deal about innocent people who are poisoned, killed or otherwise preyed upon by the arrogant and powerful. 

He has shown the strength of His arm; He has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones and has lifted up the lowly.

God cares very much about the welfare of His little ones. Once we know what is being done to God’s people, we have to speak up.

Signs elicit responses. They plant seeds. They let people know they’re not alone in seeing that something very wrong is going on, and that there are people who care about it. The media attempts to maintain the fiction that everyone believes the approved narrative, thus gaslighting the population, but with every car that passes us and our signs, we challenge that notion. And when Tyler finally does feel the pinch that the global chessmasters have already set in motion, signs will let people know that we are a community ready to stand up for them.

Join us and our signs and flags on the Tyler town square (Ferguson and Broadway), rain or shine, any Wednesday at 5:30 pm, to pray the Rosary for protection over our community, our country and our Church.  

What is CORAC?

CORAC is the Corps of Renewal and Charity, created in 2020 to help people be ready for the storm we could see on the horizon. There are members across the United States, organized into geographical regions, so that everyone has a local group, as well as access to national expertise and support in communications, health and wellness, sustainable living, crisis scenarios and prayer.

The ethic of CORAC is simple: acknowledge God, take the next right step, and be a sign of hope to others. This credo has already gotten me through some hard times. It distills all the noise and fuss down to something anyone can do. 

For people who may be isolated in leftist parts of the country, CORAC provides a forum of like-minded people of faith, so that no one need feel alone in their convictions.

CORAC team leaders have spent over a year building an infrastructure so that in a crisis situation, we would have resources already at our fingertips, ready to deploy, as well as plans thought out in advance. For example, the crisis scenario team has protocols and checklists for a variety of possible emergencies posted on the website, and ready for each family to print out and have on-hand. That team also has a communication plan to deploy in case of emergency.   

One plan relies on a national network of HAM radio operators to get communications out to each member.  The hub is a mega station in the Dallas area, and that particular operator is networked into Bishop Strickland’s ham network for the Tyler diocese.

There are resources on the website for anyone who is not yet certified as a radio operator but wants to get equipped, as well as practice sessions for those who are just listeners on shortwave radio.

The health and wellness team consists of conventional physicians, homeopaths and herbalists. They review protocols for safety and accuracy, and publish those that deal with current health issues; for example, strategies to deal with vaccine injuries, ways to stay healthy through the cold & flu season, medicinal herbs that you can find almost anywhere. Much of what is on the website consists of solutions to problems we might encounter if conventional medicine was not available.

My sister in Kansas had a very bad case of covid last year, and could not get proper treatment in her little town, being unvaxxed. She finally called an MD in the nearest city, who was able to help her enormously. By sheer coincidence, that physician was a CORAC member. Now that doctor is my sister’s regular physician.

The national reach of CORAC has allowed members to find trustworthy doctors in other parts of the country for our family members who live far away. For example, one family here in Tyler had a relative in Illinois who was in serious trouble with covid. The hospital in that area would not treat him. I was able to call the regional coordinator for Illinois, and get a recommendation for a real doctor (one who cares more for the patient than the government) who prescribed the proper medications and got him on the road to recovery.

The sustainable living team deals with such things as farming and gardening, sanitation during emergencies, foraging, canning and preserving food. They do periodic Zoom classes that are recorded and then posted on the website, along with the notes in PDF form.

The prayer team has a national network of people who are actively praying for the monthly intentions of CORAC, as well as an ongoing Catechism class with Desmond Birch, one of the foremost eschatologists in the Church today.

The prayer team is also in charge of the network which will swing into action in a crisis, and match members who want to check on their out-of-state family members, to CORAC members in that area. This network is still being built, but I was able to access it in February when I had a friend who was terribly sick and stranded in Montana. He’d gone to two ERs for help, and neither one treated him. I called a CORAC member in Montana, who got prescriptions and food to him, as well as a priest who anointed him. (He’s fine now, thanks to that CORAC member.)

That’s the power of having a national infrastructure.

CORAC Geographical Regions

At the local level, it’s up to us to draw people in and build the supportive kind of community that will be like gold if there is a breakdown of any kind. This could look like foraging walks with a group, everyone identifying different plants and taking cuttings or samples. It could be a canning tutorial where all the participants bring fruit and learn how to preserve it safely. It could be a meeting of people bringing their shortwave radios to a central spot to practice tuning. It could be a workshop of emergency medicine, like bleeding control and triage techniques.

In a technology blackout or genuine emergency, we will all be hyper-focused at the local level, by necessity, so it’s important to build relationships and skills within the local groups. Access to national expertise may also be helpful for any knowledge gaps in the local groups.

There is a plan in every town where there is a CORAC member, to meet at the local parish church at 9:00 on the Saturday morning following any multi-day communications blackout. This is our strategy to share information, as well as to seek out those who may need special help.

There is no cost to join CORAC, and some materials on the website are only available to members. In addition, members receive a biweekly newsletter with news items, inspiration, tips for action, and links to helpful resources all around the internet.

So join me and help build a local network that will be charitable, helpful and resourceful in the event of a crisis. If a crisis never materializes (we wish), we will have built a strong community with valuable skills anyway!

Get Involved

Roe Ground Zero

Once upon a time, the world was safer for children. We played outside without adults, invented games, solved our own disputes and everyone got home in time for supper. Day or night, we knew that we could (and did) knock on literally any door in the neighborhood, and the adults there would help us without question. The whole culture looked out for children.

These days, if adults are looking out for children, it may very well be to exploit them, not protect them. If kids are even allowed to play outside, there are not multiple safe havens to run to; most households have no one at home. It’s a different universe for children now; they have no idea what true safety actually is. Roe changed everything in 1973. The world was already changing, and Roe sent it nuclear.

As we look with hope to the Supreme Court’s ruling on Dobbs v. Mississippi, it’s important to listen to those who once knew a world in which children were indisputably valued under the law. Only 20% of the American public was born before January 23, 1973, and knows what a pre-Roe world looked like. We are like World War II veterans; soon our story will be buried with us. We have to tell it, and it begins in Dallas, where I grew up.

Roe v. Wade is a Texas tale. The case originated in Dallas with a Texas cast of characters: Henry Wade, the swashbuckling Dallas District Attorney; Sarah Weddington and Linda Coffee, two University of Texas law graduates; Norma McCorvey (Roe), a pregnant Dallas waitress, who wandered into the story by chance.

I was 14 years old in 1973, a freshman in a nominally Catholic high school in Dallas, and mostly unaware of national political events when Roe was handed down. My older sister remembers very well reading the Tuesday headline, “ABORTION LEGAL” on the front page of the Dallas Morning News on that fateful January day. She understood what it meant deeply enough that she remembers crying over it.

Many years later, I found out that one of my best friends was among the first in line when clinics opened the moment the decision was handed down. The clinics had been set up well in advance, ready to service women the minute the decision was announced. They were dicey affairs in sketchy parts of town, and my friend remembers it only as “hideous.” She’s spent decades trying to erase the memory, but she does recall that all the girls lay together recovering in a big space where folding cots had been set up in close lines without privacy curtains.

It seemed that January 23 was a “tipping point,” everything already in place to make the decision inevitable. It’s like the tracks were greased.

Henry Wade, the losing name in the equation, was the Democrat District Attorney for Dallas County. Wade was a big Texas legend who cast a long shadow. He had an undefeated record for criminal prosecutions, including Jack Ruby’s conviction for killing Lee Harvey Oswald. He put on a Southern-fried Columbo act, catching legal opponents in his web like a cigar-chomping spider. He was formidable.

But he seemed to have cared little about Roe. He’d earned his reputation as a prosecutor of murderers, rapists, assassins, not as a defendant of a Texas law he didn’t really support. He entrusted the defense to two associates, not interested enough to participate. In later years, he never even read the decision.

When opposing attorney Sarah Weddington was informed that the case would be argued by someone other than Wade, she is said to have thanked her lucky stars. She was only 26 years old, and had never performed in a courtroom before. Had Wade given a damn about abortion, he probably would have buried Weddington in court, and children might still be safe in the United States. Or maybe not. In hindsight, the victory appears planned and coordinated. 

In the original Dallas case, Linda Coffee and Sarah Weddington allied to force the issue of “reproductive rights” in the courts. Coffee had already sketched out a test case when she asked Weddington to join her. The legal team complete, they went looking for a plaintiff to challenge the abortion prohibition in Dallas County.

In 1969, Norma McCorvey, an addicted nomad who’d worked in carnivals and restaurants, found herself pregnant with a third child and no support. Looking for an illegal abortion, she was introduced to Coffee by an associate who knew Coffee needed a plaintiff. Norma was already 5 months along, and desperate for help. She seemed unaware that the legal proceedings would not, in fact, help her at all, given that she had only four months to delivery. That may have been the beginning of what Norma would later characterize as “being used” by people for their own purposes.

Had Coffee and Weddington actually answered Norma’s request, they would have arranged for her to get an abortion in New York or California, but they needed her to be pregnant when the suit was filed, in order to have legal standing to sue. As the legal machine was just getting warmed up, Norma delivered her daughter, who was adopted by a north Texas family, all in God’s good plan.

Meanwhile, Norma became the name of the abortion culture after the Supreme Court decision in 1973, and was passed around the country on the speech circuit. Really, she had gotten sucked up by circumstances: she wanted to lose a child at the same time that Linda Coffee desperately needed a pregnant plaintiff. Had Coffee not been so anxious to bring the case, she might have waited for a more well-spoken, more well-turned out subject than Norma. Even after years on the public stage, Norma never developed into a polished speaker, and was never quite sure what people expected of her.

Despite the fierce face she learned to put on, Norma was a fragile personality inside a hard shell. In the mid-90s, her prickly heart was cracked open by the affection of a 4-year old child who greeted her in the mornings as she went into work at a Dallas abortion mill. The child belonged to a pro-life worker, praying and counseling on the sidewalk of the facility.

Norma began attending church with that family, and in 1995, was famously baptized in a swimming pool by Rev. Flip Benham of Operation Rescue.

Through friendships with many Catholics and Fr. Frank Pavone over the ensuing years, Norma began attending Mass at the Dominican Priory at the University of Dallas. She came under the direction of a holy priest, Fr. Edward Robinson, and was received quietly into the Catholic Church in 1998.

Norma regretted her cooperation with Coffee and Weddington terribly, calling it the biggest mistake of her life. In reparation, she founded the organization “Roe No More,” hoping she would live to see the day the carnage would end. She died in 2017.

And here we are, waiting expectantly for the Supreme Court to scrub her name from the pro-abortion movement. But can the world ever go back to the times when children were safe? Unfortunately, legal and widespread abortion has given rise to evil we couldn’t even have imagined in 1973. The hard-heartedness that grows in the aftermath of abortion has built up an army of irrational ragers against pre-born life, and against those who try to protect it. Over time, the movement has dispensed with niceties, and shown itself to simply be haters of goodness and of God.

It would be poetic for legal abortion to end in Dallas, where it began. And indeed, Dallas has built up a full-bodied pro-life organization with paid staff, hundreds of volunteers, and robust ministries for every phase of pregnancy and early parenthood. It’s been called the most effective diocesan pro-life organization in the world.

But it appears the honor of ending legal abortion will belong to Jackson, Mississippi, where the Jackson Women’s Health Organization of the case Dobbs v Jackson is still in business, pending the Supreme Court decision. A good synopsis of the case is here: https://www.ncregister.com/news/mississippi-pro-life-law-biggest-case-on-abortion-in-30-years.

Every pro-life organization and person in the country will need to step up if Roe is overturned by the Dobbs decision, as appears likely. It will take at least a generation for people to modify their behavior when abortion is less easily available. The children may be protected by law, but the task of reclaiming all the souls who have been coarsened by access to abortion will be epic. All hands will be needed.

Norma’s story should serve as encouragement. As a pro-abortion activist, she was none too pleasant, and I expect I would have recoiled from her anger the same way I recoil from the screeching rage that we see displayed now, across the country and even on our own small city square. But after everything she had done, and everything done to her, she retained enough of her true self to embrace Christ. I don’t think she ever fully healed from the damage she’d sustained, but Jesus and Mary brought her the rest of the way.

That’s a possibility for every person we encounter on the mined battlefields we will travel in this next era. Even if the Supreme Court doesn’t strike down Roe, notice has been served: the pro-abortion folks will never again take it for granted. The change is here, no matter what the Court does. And whether Miss Norma is in Purgatory or Heaven, she can pray for us. She can remind us that every angry woman can be saved.

May God strengthen us all to pave the way for goodness, after Roe is redeemed.

2000 Mules Waiting For Its Audience: Movie Review

The night after I saw “2000 Mules,” I didn’t sleep.

I went on Monday, May 2, opening night. I wanted to be part of the first wave if the film had the paradigm-shifting power I thought it might. I also prefer to see a movie before I read any reviews, so that I can experience my genuine reactions, free of any subconscious prejudices I may have picked up from others.

When I emerged from the theater, my mind was staggered with all the provocative issues the movie raised… and then, when I turned my phone back on, it was all blown up with messages about the Supreme Court leak. It really felt like the world had indeed shifted in the course of one evening, and that is not conducive to sleep.

Since Monday night, only one paradigm has taken over the national conversation, leaving “2000 Mules” in its dust. But like every other manufactured crisis (draft written months ago, final decision pending, the leak intentional and timed), the public’s attention will not stay focused for long. And when people realize that Roe is still not overturned, there will be “2000 Mules,” patiently waiting for you to notice.

For anyone who thinks that election fraud is not in the same universe of importance as Roe v Wade, I maintain that our best chance to restore a culture that values life is to have fair elections, in which decent people actually have a chance of being heard.

A week before the release of Dinesh D’Souza’s new film, an internet pundit predicted that soon, everyone would know what geo-fencing was. And if you see the film, you will want to know much more about the technology that True the Vote used to isolate the most egregious mules, in the most contested states, in arguably the most important US presidential election in history.

The term “mules” comes from drug cartel culture, where a mule is someone who illegally traffics substances for profit. The term was popularized by the 2018 Clint Eastwood movie, “The Mule,” in which the lead character begins to courier illegal drugs across the border to make enough money to save his broken existence. Votes are the drug in “2000 Mules,” and since it is incontrovertibly illegal to traffic ballots, the analogy holds.

Showing in an almost abandoned, echoingly empty mall, the theatre was packed. The only empty seats were in the neck-strain section of the very front row. The audience was like a noisy Pentecostal church congregation, shouting and cheers for the white hats, hissing and boos for the criminals. No one seemed to mind the noise.

As movies go, it was not great cinema. You could clearly see that Dinesh and Debbie were re-creating the setup scenes, like when they’re in their kitchen chatting and the phone chimes, and whaddaya know, it’s Catherine Engelbrecht of True the Vote, calling to tell him that there are some things he’s going to want to see. Then you see Dinesh’s car pulling up to a mysterious warehouse-looking place for the Great Reveal. Yes, it’s a little hokey, but it was a humanizing device to add a bit of normalcy to a straight documentary format.

(It was especially amusing how Debbie could not stop smiling during the presentation of the evidence, which was as serious as myocarditis. She’s just so darn proud of her husband, she couldn’t keep it off her face.)

The inclusion of Dennis Prager, Sebastian Gorka, Charlie Kirk, Larry Elder and Eric Metaxas was another humanizing device. They were the Geiger counters. Dinesh solicited their opinions before and after they saw the evidence so you could see what effect it had. Before, several of them were unwilling to state categorically that the 2020 election was fraudulent, though they were suspicious. Afterward… well, you’ll see.

True the Vote is the real star of the movie, represented by founder Catherine Engelbrecht and data analyst Gregg Phillips. They say that the movie is just the beginning of a marathon effort and that they will not quit. Thank God for them! Gregg is the data specialist, and I would like to have heard much more from him, but the movie kept the premise simple enough to reach the majority.

Mules are identified as illegal couriers who picked up harvested ballots at central organizing points, and then visited multiple dropboxes to deliver them, often in the middle of the night. The team selected only those mules who visited at least 10 dropboxes and at least 5 non-profit organizations, where they presumably picked up batches of illegally obtained ballots.

The story of the electronic data used to identify these worst of offenders will surprise you. Did you know that vendors of phone apps collect your location data and sell it, through brokers, to anyone willing to pay? Analysts are able to build a “pattern of life” from the signals our cell phones emit. That explains why, when I get in my car, without ever opening an app, there is a notification with directions to my next destination. And it’s usually correct. It “knows” where I go on a regular basis.

In any case, True the Vote obtained two petabytes (a pedabyte is a million gigabytes) of data, ten trillion cell phone pings, and four million minutes of government surveillance video for their research. Curiously (wink) many of the cameras dedicated to surveilling the dropboxes had been disabled, but there’s plenty enough to carry the point. Video after video shows mules dropping off big handfuls of ballots. Anyone attempting to explain these videos away as rational behavior needs to answer the questions: who has access to so many ballots? who wears nitrile gloves to drop off ballots? who votes in the middle of the night? who takes photos of the ballots before dropping them in? who goes to dozens of different dropboxes on a Pac-man sort of a route through the city?

True the Vote only looked at certain counties within five swing states: Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin. Using the criteria of 10 dropboxes and 5 stash houses, they identified only the worse of the offenders. The fraud is potentially much, much bigger.

We learn that it is always and everywhere indisputably illegal to pay anyone for a ballot. Whistleblowers described how traffickers in nursing facilities appropriated or forged the ballots for people who were legally incompetent to vote. Did you know that a mail-in ballot probably went to your old addresses, as the Democrat party agitated for universal mail-in balloting in 2020? I had to wonder if COVID was created for just this purpose. Ballot harvesters target places like college dorms, apartment complexes and nursing facilities, places where people establish an address for only a short time. That leaves large numbers of ballots undeliverable to the proper person.

I guess I thought there was a mechanism in place to purge me from the voter rolls of my former addresses, but apparently not. This is a solid steel reason to go back to in-person voting. There could still be cheating, but it would be much more difficult.

One caveat to the overwhelming conclusion that Trump won the election is that legal proof was not shown that all the fraudulent ballots were marked for Biden. Anyone with a lick of sense knows they were, but it’s not provable by the movie. I would think that identification and investigation of the non-profit stash houses where the ballots were distributed to the mules would provide that evidence, but perhaps that is part of the marathon effort that True The Vote has pledged. 

“2000 Mules” presents the mere tip of the iceberg, and makes any thinking person want to know more about that electronic evidence. Then we all have the task of motivating law enforcement to take action on it.

The movie was set to detonate on Monday night, but suddenly, thanks to the Roe leak, no one was listening. Strange, that. But the evidence is there nevertheless. The criminals only got a reprieve, not a pardon. Go watch the movie and be a part of justice unfolding. 

Watch movie online as it goes public Friday, May 6, at 7:00 pm Eastern: https://2000mules.com/

Excellent textual background (in six parts): https://kanekoa.substack.com/p/2000-mules-exposing-the-ballot-traffickers?s=w

We Want Your Story!

The East Texas Catholic community welcomes you and would love to know the story of how you landed in the Diocese of Tyler. We believe sharing your story will inspire others and will give God glory by sharing how He is working in your life.

We would also like to use your story to produce a book to give to Bishop Strickland to fill his heart with hope for the future of the Church. This book of stories will also serve as a historical document for the Diocese of Tyler.

In addition to your story, we have a professional photographer, Mark Tanner, who is available to capture our beautiful faces for the book.

To organize your thoughts, the outline below may help. You don’t have to follow the order or the exact prompts. Please feel free to be as detailed as you would like.  Include dates and experiences before, during and after your arrival in Texas. 

A rough draft is all we need.  We want to make this easy for you.  After all, you have had a lot going on! Your submission will be edited, with your permission, to have some unity in format. If you would like to share but want to remain anonymous, just let us know.  We won’t print anything without your permission.

Submit your story to Celeste Spitz in digital format. This can be done by email, on a thumb drive, or through the website TruthForSouls.com.  We will provide you with a copy of the final draft for your review.  Again, rough drafts are all we need!

Thank you so much for participating in this collection.  May God bless you and your families and enrich your faith through our beautiful Catholic community here in East Texas. 

Contact us with any questions or to submit your story below:

Rebecca Cali, MD

Publisher

Celeste V. Spitz

Editor


Outline

  1. Begin with a short paragraph about you and your family.
  • Where are you from?
  • What was your home like? 
  • Were you and your family member working, retired, students, etc.    

2. What was the situation in your community and parish during the time you first had thoughts about relocating?

  • What factors impacted your decision? 
  • Were restrictions or regulations of the state a factor?       
  • What was your previous parish life like and were you active in the parish?

3. Describe the point at which you made a definite decision to move.

  • Was there a specific incident that was the tipping point?
  • Was it a result of prayer- perhaps a novena to St Joseph? Special devotions?
  • Did you hear about or do research about other places to live besides Tyler?

4. How did Tyler or East Texas enter as a possible relocation place?

  • Did you know about the Bishop here?
  • Did you have friends or family in the area?
  • Employment opportunities?

 5. The moving process. 

  • What was your experience selling your home and finding a new home.
  • Did you quit a job (how was that?).  Did you have to find a new job?
  • How did you get your belongings to Texas?
  • What was the experience when you actually left your former home?

6. Settling in Texas.  Describe the process of assimilating into your new community and parish.

  • Did you and your family members feel welcome right away or did it take time?
  • Do you find daily life very different than where you came from?
  • Have you gotten involved in the parish?  Do you see yourself in a specific role?

7. Looking Back.  

  • As you look back, do you see how God worked in your life to guide and direct you to this point?
  • Did you have any experiences during this process that you would consider miracles?
  • Has it turned out to meet your expectations, your hopes?  Or has the experience been just different than what you expected. 
  • Has this experienced increased your faith?
  • Anything else you would like to add?

For the Priests

To Our Lady’s Beloved Priests,
 
If you are not familiar with the Marian Movement of Priests, I encourage you to take the time to read Mary’s messages given during the 70s, 80s, and 90s to Fr. Gobbi for the priests. Her priests. These messages will give you much needed support and even direction during the circumstances we find ourselves in regarding the Church.  Please enjoy this message to Fr. Gobbi and her Beloved Priest Sons.  You can find more information on the website: https://mmp-usa.net/

God bless you and keep you.

              # 83  
October 18, 1975
Feast of St. Luke the Evangelist
 
Be Joyous
 “I have chosen you, my son, for this simple reason: because you are the poorest, the smallest and the most limited. Humanly speaking, you are the most destitute.
 
I have chosen you because in your past life my Adversary had almost succeeded in claiming a victory. In your life, I have had you live, as if by anticipation, the experience of what I myself will do at the moment of my great triumph.
 
My Adversary will one day think that he is celebrating a complete victory: over the world, over the Church, over souls.
 
It will be only then that I will intervene — terrible and victorious — that his defeat may be all the greater when he is certain in his conviction that he has conquered once for all.
 
What is in preparation is so extraordinary that its like has never happened since the creation of the world. That is why everything has already been predicted in the Bible.
 
The terrible struggle between me, the Woman Clothed with the Sun, and the Red Dragon, Satan, who has now succeeded in seducing many even with the error of Marxist atheism, has already been foretold to you. The struggle between the angels together with my children and the followers of the dragon led by the rebellious angels has already been foretold to you. Above all, my complete victory has already been clearly foretold.
 
You, my sons, have been called to live through these events.
 
It is now the time for you to know this, that you may be consciously prepared for the battle. This is now the time for me to begin disclosing part of my plan.
 
First of all, it is necessary that my Enemy have the impression of having conquered everything, of having Everything now in his hands. This is why he will be permitted to penetrate even into the interior of my Church, and he will succeed in plunging the sanctuary of God into darkness. He will reap the greatest number of victims from among the ministers of the sanctuary.
 
This will in fact be a time of great falls on the part of my beloved sons, my priests.
 
Satan will seduce some of them by pride, others by love of the flesh, others by doubts, others by unbelief, and still others by discouragement and loneliness.
 
How many will have doubts about my Son and about me and will believe that this is the end of my Church!
 
Priests consecrated to my Immaculate Heart, my beloved sons whom I am gathering together for this great battle, the first weapon that you must make use of is trust in me. It is your complete abandonment to me.
 
Conquer the temptation of fear, of discouragement, of sadness.
Distrust paralyzes your activity and greatly benefits my Adversary.
 
Be serene; be joyful!
 
This is not the end of my Church; what is in preparation is the beginning of its total and marvelous renewal!
 
The Vicar of my Son, in virtue of a gift I grant to him, is already able to foresee this, and though living in the present moment of sadness, he invites you to be joyous.
 
‘To be joyous?’ you ask me, all surprised.
 
Yes, my sons, in the joy of my Immaculate Heart where I enfold you all. My motherly Heart will be for you the place of your peace, while outside the most violent storm is raging.
 
Even If you have been wounded, even if you have fallen many times, even if you have doubted, even if at certain times you have betrayed your calling, do not become discouraged, because I love you!
 
The more my Adversary will have sought to rage about you, the greater will be my love for you.
 
I am the Mother, and I love you all the more, my sons, for your having been snatched away from me.
 
And my joy is to make each one of you, priests beloved of my Immaculate Heart, sons so purified and strengthened that from now on no one will ever again succeed in snatching you from the love of my Son Jesus.
 
I will make of you living copies of my Son Jesus.
 
And so be content, be confident and be totally abandoned to me. Remain always in prayer with me.
 
The weapons that I will use to fight and win this battle will be your prayer and your suffering.
 
And so then, yes, you too will be on the cross with me and with my Son Jesus, close to his Mother and yours. And then I myself will do everything, because God has arranged that this be my hour, my hour and yours, O sons consecrated to my Immaculate Heart.”