Signs

Signs Around Town

Since the Supreme Court decision on Dobbs, I’ve observed protestors on our Tyler public streets and parks half a dozen times, carrying threatening and blasphemous signs. My heart sinks; our mostly Christian, friendly little city, where you see “WE LOVE LIFE” lawn signs all around town, occupied by raging, shouting  women, glorying in their ability to offend.

The website http://www.wewontgoback.com posts the details of pro-abortion protests all over the country and includes downloadable poster designs, though the most disturbing signs I saw in Tyler were homemade ones, more horrific than these from the website. 

Signs have the power to rouse people, for good or ill.

Prayer on the Square

We hold signs, too, when we pray on the town square. Back on January 12, 2022, long before the abortion protests, a group of Catholic prayer warriors began meeting on Wednesday evenings in our city square to pray the rosary. We were acting in solidarity with Catholics in Austria, who had begun to pray for help against the tyrannical measures of their government, under the name “Austria Prays.” We held signs and flags, intended to help wake passersby up to the dangers bearing down on good people all over the world.

The Canadian Truckers’ Convoy was in full swing at that point, and we were eager to support them. They were perhaps the first globally-visible Freedom Fighters, though their efforts ended in apparent defeat. I say “apparent” because the government crackdown on peaceful protestors alerted us to the dangers of central banking when you hold opinions that differ from the government’s official narrative. Prime Minister Trudeau so casually ordered the bank accounts of truckers frozen, that the whole world saw how easy it would be for governments to manipulate a central banking system. For that forewarning alone, the whole Canadian truckers’ movement was worthwhile.

One of the founding couples of our Prayer on the Square arrived from Canada last year, and Martin proudly held the beautiful Maple Leaf flag in the early days, alongside the Stars and Stripes.

Life in little Tyler, Texas was pretty sedate all winter and spring, but we could see the global community rising up against the lies and over-reach of governments. We hoped that Americans would be energized by the Canadian patriots, to fight for freedom here, but Tyler was not feeling the pinch yet. 

When the American People’s Convoy launched on February 23 from California to Washington DC, we were super-enthused. We wished, rather than believed, that it would light a spark in the American people, but it was still not time. Enough people have to be alarmed and personally affected by tyranny before there will be a mass outcry.

So we keep praying, every Wednesday at 5:30, rain or shine. We’ve been meeting for seven months now, and we actually rather enjoy it. There is joy in praying the rosary together, we love the honks from passing cars, and we enjoy our fellowship over dinner afterwards. Since we pray on public sidewalks, we are not required to have a permit, but we’ve had one nevertheless, every week we’ve been out there. It puts us on solid ground with law enforcement, and alerts them to our presence. 

Once a month, we visit the nearby police station with pizza, cookies and other treats, to demonstrate our appreciation, and cultivate a relationship with police. They have our backs, as we saw when the abortion protestors marched in front of the Cathedral. We want them to know that we have theirs. 

Some of our signs could be considered “political,” but at this point, politics are over: there is only good and evil. Is it political to urge Americans to pay very close attention to their freedoms (including freedom to worship) as governments globally crack down? Is it political to point out the dangerous experimental shot that was forced on the world without ever receiving approval (and which still does not have approval,) but which has killed and disabled hundreds of thousands of victims?

Soon we will have a sign of solidarity with farmers worldwide, who are being put out of the food production business, thus setting up a worldwide famine. If Christians don’t stand up for such things, who will? It’s not politics; it’s solidarity.

In the Netherlands, farmers block a major highway with their tractors during a national protest. 

Frankly, I’m not sure God cares about what we call “politics”, but I think He cares a great deal about innocent people who are poisoned, killed or otherwise preyed upon by the arrogant and powerful. 

He has shown the strength of His arm; He has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones and has lifted up the lowly.

God cares very much about the welfare of His little ones. Once we know what is being done to God’s people, we have to speak up.

Signs elicit responses. They plant seeds. They let people know they’re not alone in seeing that something very wrong is going on, and that there are people who care about it. The media attempts to maintain the fiction that everyone believes the approved narrative, thus gaslighting the population, but with every car that passes us and our signs, we challenge that notion. And when Tyler finally does feel the pinch that the global chessmasters have already set in motion, signs will let people know that we are a community ready to stand up for them.

Join us and our signs and flags on the Tyler town square (Ferguson and Broadway), rain or shine, any Wednesday at 5:30 pm, to pray the Rosary for protection over our community, our country and our Church.  

Novena for Bishop Joseph E. Strickland

Join us, the faithful sheepfold of the Diocese of Tyler, and become a Prayer Warrior for our Good Shepherd. Let’s unite to pray, from wherever you call home, in or outside the Diocese of Tyler, and show our love and support for his Excellency Bishop Joseph E. Strickland, Bishop for the World!

Beginning on Tuesday, November 29th & Ending on December 7th

Novena to the Immaculate Conception

During the nine days of prayer, you are invited to make a Holy Hour for Bishop Strickland at the Chapel of Sts. Peter & Paul or wherever you can adore Jesus in the Eucharist. The intentions of Bishop Strickland’s Novena will be submitted at the tomb of Venerable Fulton J. Sheen at the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception in Peoria, Illinois.

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“Please assure all those who join in this Novena that I will offer Mass for them.”

~ Bishop Joseph Strickland~

Go to Novena

What Time Is It?

Something we all need to consider. Especially with Thanksgiving this week and Lent starting on Sunday. May our eyes be lifted up to Jesus who holds us in His Sacred Heart. And, may we take Our Mother’s hand and ask her to make our hearts like hers. Blessed Mother, help us to trust in your direction and lead us back to your Son during these dark days.

Newcomers ~ November Event

Register Here

We will have our November Newcomers event at the Young’s beautiful ranch. Everyone is welcome. Newcomers and those who have led the way! Come enjoy a day in the country with family and make some new friends.

Enjoy fishing at the lake, playing games on the lawn or taking a hike around the property. Kids can enjoy bobbing for apples and we will have a big bonfire in the evening!

First Annual Chili Cook Off!

    • Bring your best and compete for the Title: Chili Champion!
    • Only 5 Entries will be allowed so register now if you want to participate.
    • Make your chili at home and bring enough for 20 cups!
    • Sunday, November 13, 2022
    • Starting at 2pm until after the sun goes down!
    • Location: Lindale TX ~ Address will be provided to those who register.

What to bring:

    • Camp chairs
    • Beverages to share
    • Dish to share
    • Musical instrument if you play
    • If you have kids (or just want to act like one) a couple of apples for bobbing
    • Dress for the weather

Register Here

CORAC Field Day

Saturday, November 5 from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm

Register here: https://coracregion8.ticketleap.com/field-day/

Homesteading skills are pure gold, allowing us to live more independently and closer to the land, but these skills are no longer being passed from parent to child. If we don’t make the effort to reclaim them now, we might become the first generation of Americans who don’t know how to bring in a crop, dress and prepare game for dinner, and preserve summer’s bounty for the winter.

Join us in recovering some of these simple living practices. CORAC (Corps of Renewal and Charity) will present a Field Day of homesteading skills and inspiration on Saturday, November 5 from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm. 

The day will include keynote speakers Charlie Johnston, founder of CORAC, and Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, as well as experts in the areas of radio, fish and game, gardening, food preservation, water sourcing, foraging, raising poultry, home defense and more. There will be demonstrations and availability of experts for questions.

THIS WILL BE A WORKING DAY, WITH MANY DEMOS AND LIVE INSTRUCTION. 

Event goes on, rain or shine. All talks and demos will be outside, under tents. The ground is unpaved so wear appropriate footwear. Since preparedness is the objective, you will be practicing self-sufficiency by bringing your own chair, refillable water bottle, snacks and layered clothing. Lunch and dinner will be provided, but anyone with dietary concerns should consider brown-bagging. Mass will be celebrated during the day.

Location is a family farm in Lindale, TX. Specific address and further details, as well as a schedule of presentations, will be sent to registrants by October 23.

Registration is $20 for CORAC members, $30 for non-members and $40 for all registrants after October 20. We respectfully request that you not bring children under the age of 12. It’s going to be a long day, and there are hazards for children on the property. Children over age 12 register at the same price as adults. 

If you’re not yet a CORAC member, consider joining. There are many benefits, and it costs nothing but your goodwill and readiness to embrace the mission of acknowledging God, taking the next right step and being a sign of hope to others. Read more about CORAC membership here: https://truthforsouls.com/2022/06/10/what-is-corac/ or visit the CORAC website at: https://corac.co

Registration for Field Day is open to all, whether or not a member of CORAC, but we’d love to have you join us. In any storm, the stronger the community, the better.

Sheryl Collmer is the regional coordinator for CORAC East Texas. You can reach her at: sherylc@coracusa.com.

Milestone at Veritatis

Masses Begin at Veritatis Splendor

First Mass in the Chapel of the Holy Family

With the debut of daily and Sunday Masses at Veritatis Splendor, the idealistic community up in Winona has sprung back onto the radar screens of east Texas Catholics. For a while, people wondered if the intentional Catholic community would die a quiet death from having bitten off too big a bite. Neighborhoods, schools, recreational facilities, a High Italian Gothic-style church… I mean, really! Somewhere north of nowhere?

But a steady tide of building activity has been going on all year, and there are some days that the property looks like a giant anthill, trucks and flatbeds plying back and forth as pipe is laid, foundations poured and building materials delivered. Infrastructure to support the first phase of neighborhoods is near completion, and lot owners have begun constructing and living on their properties. And now, the opening of the Chapel for public Mass is a major milestone in the life of Veritatis Splendor.

Fr. Stephen Thompson, main celebrant and homilist at the opening Mass

The Holy Family Chapel was completed last month, and the first Mass was celebrated on September 29, the feast of the Holy Archangels, with Bishop Strickland present. The chapel is small, to tide over the worshipping community until the magnificent Oratory on the Hill can be built, still some years in the future. The chapel seats around 50, with overflow seating for another 50. It’s a church-shaped building, constructed within a larger metal barn. It reminds me of the Holy House of Loreto, the tiny cottage where the Virgin Mary was said to have conceived of the Holy Spirit, which is now enclosed within a much larger basilica.

The Chapel is very much a “country church” with stained pine walls and aged wooden pews, with elegant highlights in the trim of the roof beams, the lovely fixtures reclaimed from older churches, and of course, the tabernacle of the Blessed Sacrament. It is a humble and amiable atmosphere in which to celebrate the Mass, including the Ordinariate Use of the Roman Rite.

The Ordinariate has captured my imagination. Ever since Pope Benedict’s expansion of the use of the Latin Mass in the 2007 Summorum Pontificumand especially the constriction of it by Pope Francis in Traditionis Custodes of 2021interest in the Latin Mass has blossomed. What is this rite by which nearly all our saints and ancestors were saved? What drove the process that changed it? Have we lost something we ought to preserve? 

More and more people want to find out for themselves, but the Latin Mass can be intimidating for those who came of age after the 1960s. It is differentand requires a bit of orientation and practice to feel confident in its celebration. 

The Ordinariate Rite is like a stepping stone to the Latin Mass. It is a beautiful liturgy with its own rich history, whose roots in the Catholic past have not been disturbed. I sometimes explain it to people as “the traditional Mass rendered in English.” The Fathers of the Pious House, who make their home at Veritatis, readily agreed to train and offer the Ordinariate. It is a new leaf in the folio of Catholic worship opportunities in east Texas.

Generically, “ordinariate” refers to an ecclesiastic organization led by someone other than the local bishop. When Anglicans began to embrace the Catholic Church in large numbers several decades ago, dialogue began between Pope Benedict and Anglican clergy. Whole Anglican congregations and dioceses wanted to become Catholic, without losing the rich patrimony of the Anglican church. They had preserved beautiful architecture, music and liturgy for their worship, and many could not bear that it be lost, to be replaced with stick-figure art, singsong music and modernistic architecture, the puerile aesthetic that had taken over many Catholic parish churches. 

Then Pope Benedict issued the exhortation Anglicanorum Coetibus in 2009, which allowed for the full communion of Anglicans with Rome, while retaining their own hymns, art and liturgy. These formerly-Anglican congregations were known as “ordinariates” and their liturgy, as the Ordinariate Use. 

The Anglican and Roman rites have a common ancestor, of course: the traditional Mass which was largely unchanged from the 3rd century until the 1960s. The Novus Ordo created some new things and jettisoned some old ones when it was promulgated in 1969, but of course, didn’t affect the Anglican Church at all. So the liturgy permitted to the Anglican Ordinariates, even after full communion with Rome, is essentially the Traditional Mass, rendered in English. 

The Mass schedule of the Holy Family Chapel gives us ample opportunity to explore our heritage in the Mass, both in Latin and in English. The Ordinariate is celebrated on Sundays at 8:30 am. Other Masses available during the week are Sundays at 10:30 am, Monday – Friday at 12:05 pm, and Saturdays at 9:00 am.

The drive from the Cathedral in downtown Tyler to the Veritatis chapel is 25 minutes into beautiful rolling hills and stands of pine. When you’re there for Mass, take a look around at the vision-becoming-reality of the Veritatis project. Remind yourself that, with perseverance and God’s grace, even dreams that people scoff at, that stumble on obstacles, that seem too good to be true, can indeed be realized, bringing something new and fresh into our lives.

Holy Family Chapel 

16711 County Road 356, Winona

The neighborhood at Veritatis Splendor is growing.

Newcomers September Event

Welcome Reception and Dinner
for All Newcomers to the Diocese of Tyler!

Saturday, September 24th at 6:30 pm
Cathedral Center of the Immaculate Conception Parish

423 S. Broadway, Tyler Tx

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Tyler

All New Families Are Welcome to Join Us!

Saturday, September 24 at 6:30 pm, directly after the 5:30 Mass, we will be welcoming all those who have moved to Tyler in the last year. The Parish Council will greet newcomers in the lobby of the Cathedral Center, then dinner will follow in the main room, hosted by the “oldcomers.”

If you’re a recent arrival,
you get to be the honorees!

If you attended the first Newcomer Reception last year or have been in Tyler for over a year… you are on the reception committee. We will be providing the food and drinks for dinner.

Bring a dish according to your last name:
A-G    Main courses
H-M   Salads, vegetables or bread
N-S   Desserts
T-Z    Wine, beer or sodas

Please email Sheryl what you plan
to bring so we can fill in any gaps!
Sclare27@aol.com

Tyler Diocesan Rosary Congress

Ushering in the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
with the Pillars of Victory: The Holy Eucharist and The Holy Rosary!

At the Request of
Bishop Strickland,
the Diocese of Tyler
will pray for the
Church, our families,
and our nation
starting on October 1st.

The Rosary Congress is an intense week of prayer that hastens the triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. This truly spiritual experience is a foretaste of how beautiful the world will be when humanity returns to the love and service of God. It will be that period of peace foretold by Our Lady of Fatima wherein the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus will be the center of our lives and the Holy Spirit will fill our hearts with the fire of his love to renew the face of the earth. 

The Diocese of Tyler is one of many Diocese across the nation offering a week of 24 hours a day of prayer by hosting a Diocesan Rosary Congress (DRC). The DRC consists of Perpetual Adoration and Hourly Rosary offered in a spirit of reparation. The Rosary Congress will travel to 7 different parishes throughout the Diocese from October 1st through October 7th, 2022. Learn More Here

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Tyler will kick off the Diocesan Rosary Congress on Saturday, October 1st at the 8:30 am Mass

Sign up for a Holy Hour at the
Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Tyler

Schedule:

Saturday, October 1st – Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception

  • 8:30am – Opening Holy Mass – Bishop Strickland
  • Followed by Eucharistic Procession – Bishop Strickland
  • Holy Rosary Chanted During Procession – Fr. Nick Napier
  • Followed by Consecration of Our Families to the Immaculate Heart of Mary – Bishop Strickland
  • Continual Adoration begins with the Holy Rosary said every hour – Laity
  • 1pm Blessed Sacrament Reposed for Wedding
  • 4pm Blessed Sacrament Exposed
  • 5:30pm Vigil Mass
  • 6:30pm Continual Adoration begins again with the Holy Rosary said every hour – Laity
  • Sunday, October 2nd, 6:00am Benediction – Bishop Strickland
  • 6:30am Closing Mass – Bishop Strickland

The DRC Continues to the Following Parishes:

  • Sunday, October 2nd – St Patrick’s, Lufkin
  • Monday, October 3rd – St Edward’s, Athens
  • Tuesday, October 4th – Sacred Heart, Mt Vernon
  • Wednesday, October 5th – St. Francis of the Tejas, Crokett
  • Thursday, October 6th – St Anthony, Longview
  • Friday, October 7th – Sacred Heart, Texarkana

Please join in this National endeavor to hasten
The Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of the Virgin Mary!

Sign up for a Holy Hour Here

For more information contact Celeste Spitz at (916) 923-8272 or email her at maryschildcvs@gmail.com

Let’s Pray for Bishop Joseph E. Strickland!

Join us, the faithful sheepfold of the Diocese of Tyler, and become a Prayer Warrior for our Good Shepherd. Let’s unite to pray, from wherever you call home, in or outside the Diocese of Tyler, and show our love and support for his Excellency Bishop Joseph E. Strickland, Bishop for the World!

Beginning on Wednesday, September 7th & Ending on Thursday, September 15th
The Feast of our Lady of Sorrows

During the nine days of prayer, you are invited to make a Holy Hour for Bishop Strickland at the Chapel of Sts. Peter & Paul or wherever you can adore Jesus in the Eucharist. The intentions of Bishop Strickland’s Novena will be submitted at the tomb of Venerable Fulton J. Sheen at the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Immaculate Concept ion in Peoria, Illinois.

SIGN UP TO BELOW TO RECEIVE DAILY NOVENA REMINDERS

Reminders by Text:

We have created a group on Signal to send reminders by text. You must have the Signal App to receive these reminders. Follow the link(s) below to select this option.

Already have Signal: Click Here To Join The Group

Need to get Signal: Click Here To Get The Signal App

Reminders by Email?

“Please assure all those who join in the Novena that I will offer Mass for them.”

~ Bishop Joseph Strickland

EFFICACIOUS NOVENA TO THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

I. O my Jesus, you have said: “Truly I say to you,
ask and it will be given you, seek and you will find,
knock and it will be opened to you.”
Behold I knock, I seek and ask for the grace of…

 (Mention your intention here)

Our Father…Hail Mary…Glory be to the Father…

Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in you.

II. O my Jesus, you have said: “Truly I say to you,
if you ask any thing of the Father in my name, He will give it to you.”
Behold, in your name, I ask the Father for the grace of…

(Mention your intention here)

Our Father…Hail Mary…Glory be to the Father…

Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in you.

III. O my Jesus, you have said: “Truly I say to you,
heaven and earth will pass away but my words will not pass away.”
Encouraged by your infallible words I now ask for the grace of…

 (Mention your intention here)

Our Father…Hail Mary…Glory be to the Father…

Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in you.

O Sacred Heart of Jesus, for whom it is impossible not to have compassion on the afflicted,
have pity on us miserable sinners and grant us the grace which we ask of you,
through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary, your tender mother and ours.

  • I PRAY for Bishop Strickland to receive all the graces needed to carry out the mission given to him by God the Almighty Father.
  • I PRAY for Bishop Strickland to be led by the Holy Spirit in all his daily actions carried out with Divine Wisdom as he guides his flock to eternal happiness in heaven.
  • I PRAY for Bishop Strickland to be continually protected by the intercession of Immaculate the Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus as he defends the True Catholic Faith and the Sanctity of Life.
  • I PRAY also for State Senator Bryan Hughes, R-Mineola, who authored the Texas Heartbeat Law which was recently upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court. Bless and protect him, his family and his good work for the sanctity of life and for the sovereignty of the states.
  • I PRAY also for the increase, within our Diocese, of priestly vocations and for all seminarians and religious.

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have Mercy On Us!

A Parish Library

where faith meets reason

In the spiritual life, to stand still is to go backward. Therefore, the serious Catholic is always forging ahead; it is prayer and reading that move us along. For a Catholic, the exercise of the mind probing the mysteries of the Faith, and the exercise of the spirit in worship are like the two wings of a dove. One without the other is an imbalance. Reading informs prayer, and prayer informs reading.

The Catholic faith is like a suitcase with no bottom: there is no end to the unpacking. And that’s what captivates us: the Faith is so much bigger than we are. No matter how old we get, there is still more. 

So we study. We read things that make us gasp in wonder, fall silent in awe, provoke our minds to pursue what those before us have discovered. When we are reading truly good spiritual material, the reading becomes prayer. The best of Catholic literature makes you go deep inside. 

To assist reason in its effort to understand the mystery there are the signs which Revelation itself presents. These serve to lead the search for truth to new depths, enabling the mind in its autonomous exploration to penetrate within the mystery by use of reason’s own methods, of which it is rightly jealous.

St. John Paul II, Fides et Ratio, 13

It’s said that the internet has made physical book reading obsolete, so some wonder if the Cathedral Library will be just a beautiful adornment with no great use. I don’t think so. It’s easy enough to read light novels on a screen, but navigating long or deep texts in an intuitive way is difficult on screens. Reading on screen is like being in a 6-foot deep pool; even if you had the breath to dive much deeper, you’re limited by the space. Reading a physical book is more like treading water over the Mariana Trench; it’s seven miles to the bottom so there’s virtually no limit to how far you dive.

Think about reading a spiritual text in adoration: you periodically stop to ponder something. If you’re on a screen, your device probably goes to sleep, so you have to log in again, and find the place you left. On a physical page however, with the book resting in your lap, your eye tends to go right back to where you left off, without disturbing the environment of contemplation, which is notoriously difficult to recover. 

What about serious spiritual study, the sort required to profit from reading Newman’s Apologia Pro Vita Sua, St. Augustine’s City of God, a tractate of the Summa Theologica, or St. John Paul’s Theology of the Body – that is, texts that require intense concentration? 

Or books that require personal introspection, like de Caussade’s Abandonment to Divine Providence, de Sales’ Introduction to the Devout Life, or St. Thérèse’s Story of a Soul? These classics could be read on-screen, but would the deep penetration of the spirit by the text occur in the same way? 

What about Frank Sheed’s reflection on the Trinity in Theology and Sanity? I can’t imagine that experience being comparable when read on the same device where I play Sudoku and check the weather. 

Or try reading Cardinal Sarah’s The Power of Silence, where he just comes right out and tells you to ditch the screen for any spiritual reading or liturgy!

Reading and re-reading is characteristic of spiritual comprehension. Sometimes we read a line that we sense is significant, but we only “get it” on the third or fourth repetition. Finding and re-reading a particular passage is tough going on a device, but our brains actually perform a “mapping” function when we read on a physical page. We are gifted with a physical sense of where a certain passage appears in a book. It’s like taking a hike in the hills; we have a sense of where the path crossed the stream, and how far back the clearing was. 

Prove it to yourself. Read something sacred on your phone. Absorb it, turn it over in your mind. Let it rest and then go back to it. Now try the same thing with a paged book. Compare the experiences.

I believe the Library will be well used by those who are serious about growing in their faith, those who are pursuing the Mystery, and want to follow in the footsteps of the great saints and theologians who came before us. People who are new to the Faith, such as RCIA participants, and those who are returning to the Faith after an absence, will be particularly well-served. A good parish library is an evangelization tool. 

Faith meets reason in a parish library, where we can be transformed by the renewal of our minds. The Cathedral Library is being assembled right now. Stay tuned for the Grand Opening this fall.

Getting ready for books